Books About Richmond upon Thames

The other day I was talking to a friend of mine about Totally Richmond and he asked me a slightly irritating question.

Surely there are enough websites in the world already? What we need are more books. When did you last read a great book about Richmond?

Yes, that really was irritating since most of my life is digital. But like Steve (my old-fashioned friend) I do appreciate a good book, especially as an excuse to save my eyes from another computer screen.

I didn’t do very well discovering novels about Richmond (although there are plenty about the kings and queens who’ve lived around here in the past) but there are a few good coffee table publications.

Portrait of Richmond

Stuart Saul’s Portrait of Richmondis a photo journey through a large part of the Borough, from Kew Bridge to Teddington Lock.

There’s no doubt Stuart’s a talented local photographer – and you can see examples of his work on his photoblog.

 

 

A Year in the Life of Richmond

Joanna Jackson’s A Year in the Life of Richmondexplores Richmond over the course of a year, capturing every aspect of the town, from the Georgian terraces to the pubs, park and riverside.

Alongside the stunning photos she tells a number stories of its associations through the ages with royalty, pop music and rugby.

 

Richmond upon Thames Treasure Hunt on Foot


I’m actually quite looking forward to trying this out.

Richmond Upon Thames Treasure Hunt on Foot claims to take you past The Old Town Hall, The Parish Church, Richmond Green, The River Thames, Heron Square and The Museum Of Richmond, and get you looking around opening your eyes to the things you would ordinarily walk straight past.

 

A Year in the Life of Richmond Park

A Year in the Life of Richmond Park is the second book from Joanna Jackson – and I don’t think you need to be a rocket scientist to work out which was the previous one.   The principle is the same – a number of beautiful photos showing Richmond Park through every season.

We’re so used to seeing pictures of the Park in the summer (because that’s when we’re outside with our cameras) that it’s great to see winter, spring and autumn captured so beautifully.

 

Richmond upon Thames, Then and Now


Richmond-upon-Thames Then & Nowisn’t due for release until September 2013, so I haven’t been able to see it for real, but the blurb at Amazon tells me

“Contrasting a selection of 45 archive images alongside full-colour modern photographs, this book traces some of the changes and developments that have taken place in Richmond-upon-Thames during the last century…. [to] reveal changing modes of fashion and transportation, shops and businesses, houses and public buildings, and, of course, some of the local people who once lived and worked in the area.”